Bobi Wine has dragged the Kampala Metropolitan Commander Frank Mwesigye and the state to court.

The member of parliament is suing government for illegally stopping his music concert, he says.

Bobi Wine's court letter

Bobi Wine’s court letter

He wrote to Xclusive UG: “Today I filed a case at the High Court against the state and Mr. Frank Mwesigwa for illegally stopping my music concerts in Kamuli, Mukono, Kasese, and Busoga region.

As I said, we shall be taking all other lawful measures to ensure that this partisan police STOPS violating the rights of the people of Uganda with impunity.

 

As an artist, singing has been my job for ages from which I derive my livelihood, that of my family and very many of my dependents. My shows are also a source of enjoyment and pleasure to millions of Ugandans.

 

They should understand that some of us are not corrupt government officials like most of them. We sweat for our bread. I sing for my fans and my fans also support me.

And someone thinks they will sit in their office and put an end to my singing career?

 

We are seeking declarations from Court that stopping my music concerts would violate many laws including my right to life and livelihood under Article 22 of the Constitution, my right to work

under Article 40, my freedom to move freely throughout Uganda as guaranteed by Article 29(2) (a), my freedom of expression under Article 29, and my right to civic participation under Article 38.

 

Denying multitudes of Ugandans the opportunity to attend my music concerts violates their freedom of association which is protected by Article 29(1) (e) of the Constitution.

Bobi speaking to the media today

Bobi speaking to the media today

We want court to declare that NEVER AGAIN should police stop any one from enjoying their rights as guaranteed by the Constitution.

I would also wish that Court orders these highhanded officials to individually compensate my promoters for the losses they have incurred due to the cancelled shows.

 

THIS IS OUR CASE- when the time for its hearing comes, we shall all go and be heard.

 

Finally some people wonder whether we can get justice from our courts.

Yes our institutions are dead, but what gives me hope is that there are many good people everywhere in Uganda- these are our brothers, sisters, mothers, fathers, sons, daughters and friends. You find them in the courts, in the police, in the UPDF, in the public service, in Parliament, everywhere.

People who still have a conscience. They are only unlucky to serve a ridiculously dead system. I am confident that justice shall prevail.”

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